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Marketability eBulletin

Welcome to our latest fortnightly eBulletin, posted here on 3 October 2017. In this issue:


10 tricks to appear smart in meetings, love these at cooperreview.com

This list popped up on Facebook last week and I just had to share it. By Sarah Cooper, author of 100 Tricks to Appear Smart in Meetings (which I might just have to buy). I guarantee that you will be trying at least one of these in a meeting very soon, that you’ll be watching for them being deployed by your co-workers, and realising that some of them have been doing so (and impressing you!) for some time.

If you’ve attended one of our training courses recently and asked me to go back a slide, were you consciously deploying trick #8? If so, now I’m wise to you!

Enjoy for yourself at the Cooper Review website.

Our training courses are designed to help you make smart decisions without tricks (although sometimes they help, after all I am a marketer by trade). Here’s a reminder of courses available

 


What implications does REF have for open access in monograph publishing?

In future all articles and conference papers submitted to the Research Excellence Framework will need to be available on an open access basis. And after 2021 this will be extended to books, too. The potential implications for academic publishers and monographs are significant.

Marilyn Deegan’s recent article in THE outlines some of the issues, and broadly urges academia against ‘destroying an academic publishing industry that has served us well’. Naturally the comments both in support and against her arguments are as revealing as the article itself.

Deegan is professor of digital humanities at King’s College London. Read her article for yourself in THE.

Our Academic Marketing Workshop is the place to be to discuss the implications of issues like these.

 


Fascinating case study: the established fiction author and her student-led publisher

Jane Johnson is a leading fiction publisher and established author in her own right. Her latest book, Court of Lions, was published a couple of months ago by Head of Zeus and crits have been effusive.

But an earlier novel already published in Canada had failed to find a UK publisher. When Debbie Jane Williams, who runs the publishing course at UCLan, approached Jane to ask if she’d consider her MA students publishing it Jane saw this as an intriguing proposition and said yes. One of the benefits will be the fresh approach that the students bring to the project, which can be so hard to achieve in an established publishing house bound by processes and expectations often bedded in over decades.

Pillars of Light publishes on 5 October and I for one will be watching its progress keenly.

Read the (free) article in BookBrunch.

If you’d like to freshen up your own practice with new ideas and fresh approaches, do take a look at our range of courses, all of them also guaranteed to be practical and pragmatic.

 


On The Marketability Grapevine on Facebook

  • An editorial assistant in the trade division at Bloomsbury talks eloquently about the job (in 2010). If this is your role too, how much do you recognise?
  • Read something that hit the spot in this eBulletin? Click through and like the item or add a comment on Facebook
  • Watch the wall for postings of new jobs, or feel free to add to them.

Visit The Marketability Grapevine.

 


Tip of the week: Remember to apply the law of diminishing returns

Thank you to Gurdeep Mattu, a publisher at Bloomsbury Academic, for raising this one in a Copywriting Workshop there last month. We were discussing writing copy under (the inevitable, in our business) time pressures, and for monographs specifically. Since monographs sell primarily based on title, author, TOC and being found online (SEO) we agreed that copywriting should almost always be limited to copyediting the author’s description rather than investing time making copy ‘enticing’ for a broader audience that isn’t there. And, as Gurdeep reminded me, this is neatly expressed by the law of diminishing returns, or knowing when to stop …

This and many topics like it are covered on our Copywriting Workshop, available as a public course or in-house tailored to meet your needs and reflect your markets.

 

 

 

 

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